Scripture Sunday (35)

Scripture Sunday is a weekly quote-post to highlight Bible passages I’ve read recently that I found particularly interesting. My translation is the New International Version.

From my reading this week:

I remember my affliction and my wandering,
the bitterness and the gall.
I well remember them,
and my soul is downcast within me.
Yet this I call to mind
and therefore I have hope:
Because of the Lord’s great love we are not consumed,
for his compassions never fail.
They are new every morning;
great is your faithfulness.
I say to myself, “The Lord is my portion;
therefore I will wait for him.”
The Lord is good to those whose hope is in him,
to the one who seeks him;
it is good to wait quietly
for the salvation of the Lord.

-Lamentations 3:19-26

Why I chose it:

I’m really bad at waiting quietly.

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Myth Monday: the legend-makers

Blessed are the legend-makers with their rhyme

of things nor found within record time.

It is not they that have forgot the Night,

or bid us flee to organised delight,

in lotus-isles of economic bliss

forswearing souls to gain a Circe-kiss

(and counterfeit at that, machine-produced,

bogus seduction of the twice-seduced).

 

Such isles they saw afar, and ones more fair,

and those that hear them yet may yet beware.

They have seen Death and ultimate defeat,

and yet they would not in despair retreat,

but oft to victory have turned the lyre

and kindled hearts with legendary fire,

illuminating Now and dark Hath-been

with light of suns as yet by no man seen.

-From “Mythopoeia” by J.R.R. Tolkien

Catch up on Myth Monday posts here.

Scripture Sunday (28)

Scripture Sunday is a weekly quote-post to highlight Bible passages I’ve read recently that I found particularly interesting. My translation is the New International Version.

From my reading this week:

So Naaman went with his horses and chariots and stopped at the door of Elisha’s house. Elisha sent a messenger to say to him, “Go, wash yourself seven times in the Jordan, and your flesh will be restored and you will be cleansed.”

But Naaman went away angry and said, “I thought that he would surely come out to me and stand and call on the name of the Lord his God, wave his hand over the spot and cure me of my leprosy. Are not Abana and Pharpar, the rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel? Couldn’t I wash in them and be cleansed?” So he turned and went off in a rage.

Naaman’s servants went to him and said, “My father, if the prophet had told you to do some great thing, would you not have done it? How much more, then, when he tells you, ‘Wash and be cleansed’!” So he went down and dipped himself in the Jordan seven times, as the man of God had told him, and his flesh was restored and became clean like that of a young boy.

-2 Kings 9-14

Why I chose it:

Moral of the story:

Stop being such a drama queen and just obey God.

 

#dwjmarch: you can quote me on that

I reread Howl’s Moving Castle for #dwjmarch, or #marchmagics or whatever the kids are calling it these days. It’s one of my favorite books by one of my favorite authors and reading it is always a joyful and rewarding experience. I have many favorite scenes and quotes, many of which are very useful in real-life situations. I have listed some of my favorites below, with suggestions on their use.

Quotes

 

“But I discovered that people like me- they do, you know, if you like them– and then it was all right.”

Use as good advice for pretty much any social situation.

“I’ve heard of you, Miss Hatter, and I don’t care for your competition or your attitude.”

Use as a good throw-down statement any time you come across one of your many nemeses.

“But I’m surely due to have a third encounter, magical or not. In fact,  I insist on one. I wonder what it will be.”

Use when you know what you want and that you’re gonna get it and if you’re open-minded about the details.

“What a stupid way to treat a building!”

Use when faced with atrocities of architecture, either in aesthetics or utility.

“I refuse to be exploited.”

Use when needed.

“I hope your bacon burns.”

Use as an all-purpose curse, but be aware it is particularly vicious.

“I am a total stranger,” Sophie lied firmly.

Use when you come across someone you have met that you would rather not speak to, e.g. , oh no it’s that lady I met at a party once and I don’t remember her name but she was awful OH NO SHE IS SPEAKING TO ME.

“I’ve reached that stage in my career when I need to impress everyone with my power and wickedness.”

Use when you’re feeling supremely self-confident and ready to take on the world.

“Keep that broom still while I cross my own room, please.”

Use when someone is in your space, messing up your vibes, and you want to show your disapproval.

“I know I’m slapdash, but there’s no need for you to copy me.”

Use when you’re showing someone how to do something and they’re foolishly trying to do it as fast as you do.

“Michael was a nice boy, Sophie thought, but a bit helpless in a crisis.”

Use when describing that one friend we all have that we wouldn’t want to trust our life to in a tense situation.

“Why have you made a jigsaw puzzle of my best suit? Just a friendly inquiry, you know.”

See “Keep that broom still” up above.

“Is that all you can do in the face of tragedy? Make toast!”

Use when someone isn’t taking your personal crisis as seriously as you think they should be.

“Don’t you think I did any of me myself, then? Put in just a few touches of my own?”

Use when others are claiming responsibility for anything good or important you’ve ever done.

“I feel ill,” he announced. “I’m going to bed, where I may die.”

Use when you’re sick enough to feel miserable but not sick enough to go to the doctor.

“I can tell Sophie is in top form at the moment, and I want this room the usual size when I come back to it.”

Use when babysitting or supervising humans of any age whom you don’t trust.

“I have caught an everlasting cold, but luckily I am terribly dishonest. I cling to that.”

Use when you need something to cling to.

“I assure you, my friends, I am cone sold stober.”

Use when those around you don’t trust your frame of mind or decision-making skills.

“You’ve no right to make jigsaws of people!”

Use to show your disapproval of someone’s completely immoral choices.

“All my flanks were weak!”

Use to admit when you were wrong and you have regrets.

Scripture Sunday (12)

Scripture Sunday is a weekly quote-post to highlight Bible passages I’ve read recently that I found particularly interesting. I’m not a qualified expert in any way, so I will keep my thoughts to my highly-subjective impressions. My translation is the New International Version.

From my reading this week:

 When Joseph’s brothers saw that their father was dead, they said, “What if Joseph holds a grudge against us and pays us back for all the wrongs we did to him?” So they sent word to Joseph, saying, “Your father left these instructions before he died: ‘This is what you are to say to Joseph: I ask you to forgive your brothers the sins and the wrongs they committed in treating you so badly.’ Now please forgive the sins of the servants of the God of your father.” When their message came to him, Joseph wept.

His brothers then came and threw themselves down before him. “We are your slaves,” they said.

But Joseph said to them, “Don’t be afraid. Am I in the place of God? You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives. So then, don’t be afraid. I will provide for you and your children.” And he reassured them and spoke kindly to them.

-Genesis 50:15-21

Why I chose it:

I’m always amazed when I read Joseph’s story. It’s easy to hold a grudge against someone, even if their offense was tiny, like a rude comment or something. And yet Joseph is able to forgive his brothers for throwing him into a well and then selling him into slavery. He learns that God always has a plan, and that plan saves lives and is for the good of those who trust Him. I  need to be patient and remember that it’s not what humans intend that matters, but what God intends, and He always uses bad events or bad motives to produce good results eventually.

Scripture Sunday (9)

Scripture Sunday is a weekly quote-post to highlight Bible passages I’ve read recently that I found particularly interesting. I’m not a qualified expert in any way, so I will keep my thoughts to my highly-subjective impressions. My translation is the New International Version.

From my reading this week: 

“But ask the animals, and they will teach you,
    or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you;
    or speak to the earth, and it will teach you,
    or let the fish in the sea inform you.
     Which of all these does not know
    that the hand of the Lord has done this?
     In his hand is the life of every creature
    and the breath of all mankind.
    Does not the ear test words
    as the tongue tastes food?
    Is not wisdom found among the aged?
    Does not long life bring understanding?

  To God belong wisdom and power;
    counsel and understanding are his.
     What he tears down cannot be rebuilt;
    those he imprisons cannot be released.
     If he holds back the waters, there is drought;
    if he lets them loose, they devastate the land.
    To him belong strength and insight;
    both deceived and deceiver are his.

-Job 12:7-16

Why I chose it:

In an age where truth is harder to find and discern than ever, I appreciate that God’s Word remains the same. I wander around trying to figure out what’s real and what’s not, and the Bible asks, “Isn’t it obvious? All of creation knows what’s up. God is the real deal and he’s not going anywhere.”

Scripture Sunday (8)

Happy New Year, all! Thanks for being here, lurking, reading, commenting! I have some new stuff planned for the blog this year, but I’m happy that the first post of this year is a quote from the most important book.

Scripture Sunday is a weekly post to highlight Bible passages I’ve read recently that were particularly interesting to me. I’m not a qualified expert in any way, so I will keep my thoughts to my highly-subjective impressions. My translation is NIV.

From my reading this week: 

This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us. And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers and sisters. If anyone has material possessions and sees a brother or sister in need but has no pity on them, how can the love of God be in that person? Dear children, let us not love with words or speech but with actions and in truth.

This is how we know that we belong to the truth and how we set our hearts at rest in his presence: If our hearts condemn us, we know that God is greater than our hearts, and he knows everything. Dear friends, if our hearts do not condemn us, we have confidence before God and receive from him anything we ask, because we keep his commands and do what pleases him. And this is his command: to believe in the name of his Son, Jesus Christ, and to love one another as he commanded us.

-1 John 3:16-23

Why I chose it:

Elsewhere in the Bible, Jesus says that the two greatest commandments are to love God and to love your neighbor as yourself. These verses are similar. It is so, so important going into this year (and always) that I love the people around me, and not with words or speech but “with actions and in truth.” Words are great, I’m a huge fan of their work, and they are a powerful tool. But loving people is an act, and Jesus has already shown us the ultimate loving act of sacrifice.

No pressure.